首页 >> 新闻 >> 正文

黄岛开发区打胎多少钱中华时讯青岛人工人流价格

2019年09月23日 19:19:47来源:京东门户

President Bush Attends Council of the Americas  THE PRESIDENT: Thank you all. Please be seated. Bill, thank you for the kind introduction. Thanks for giving me a chance to come by and see that the Secretary of State's dining room is a lot better than the President's dining room. (Laughter.) I'm honored to be here. I'm pleased to be with the Council of Americas again. I appreciate what you do to promote personal and economic freedom throughout the region, throughout the Americas. I appreciate your strong concern about the need for liberty to be sp -- liberty in forms of government and liberty in forms of economies.   I am honored to be here with the Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice, better known in the neighborhood as Sentilde;orita Arroz. (Laughter.) I'm pleased to be with Carlos Gutierrez, the Secretary of Commerce; Susan Schwab, the U.S. Trade Representative. Thrilled to be here with Susan Segal, the President and CEO of the Council of Americas; a dear family friend, former member of the Cabinet in 41, Robert Mosbacher; Mack McLarty, as well -- people who care a lot about the region. Thank you for joining us here. I'm also pleased to be here with ministers, representatives, ambassadors from the governments of Canada, Colombia, Mexico and Peru -- honored you all are here.   The foundation of good foreign policy is good relations with your neighbors. A peaceful and secure neighborhood is in the interest of the ed States of America. And so I want to talk to you about the hemisphere we share, the challenges we face, and the aggressive work that the ed States is doing to help make the Americas a place of hope and liberty.   In recent decades, there have been positive developments in Latin America. Countries have moved away from an era of dictatorships, era of civil strife. Unfortunately, today some countries in the region are seeing a resurgence of radicalism and instability. And one nation in the region remains mired in the tyranny of a bygone era -- and that is Cuba.   Yesterday I had a fascinating opportunity to speak with a leading Cuban dissident, a former political prisoner, and a wife of a man who is held in a Cuban prison simply because he expressed his belief that all people should live in a free society. Video-conferencing is one of the great wonders of the 21st century, and to be able to sit in the White House and talk to these three brave souls in Havana was a inspiring moment for me. It reminded me about how much work the ed States has to do to help the people in Cuba realize the blessings of liberty. It also reminded me of a couple of things: One, that there's an eternal truth when it comes to freedom, that there is an Almighty, and a gift of that Almighty to every man, woman and child, whether they be American, Cubano, or anywhere else, is freedom; and that it's going to take the courage and determination of individuals such as the three I met with to help inspire the island to embrace freedom.   The Cuban government recently announced a change at the top. Some in the world marveled that perhaps change is on its way. That's not how I view it. Until there's a change of heart and a change of compassion, and a change of how the Cuban government treats its people, there's no change at all. The regime has made empty gestures at reform, but Cuba is still ruled by the same group that has oppressed the Cuban people for almost half a century. Cuba will not be a land of liberty so long as free expression is punished and free speech can take place only in hushed whispers and silent prayers. And Cuba will not become a place of prosperity just by easing restrictions on the sale of products that the average Cuban cannot afford.   If Cuba wants to join the community of civilized nations, then Cuba's rulers must begin a process of peaceful democratic change. And the first step must be to release all political prisoners. They must respect the human rights in word and in deed. And they must allow what the Cuban people have desired for generations -- to pick their own leaders in free and fair elections. This is the policy of the ed States, and it must not change until the people of Cuba are free. (Applause.)   We face other challenges in the hemisphere, as well. I'm deeply concerned about the challenge of illicit drug trade. First, I fully understand that when there is demand, there will be supply. And the ed States of America is implementing a strategy to reduce -- a comprehensive strategy to convince our people to stop using illegal drugs. I talk to my counterparts all the time in the region and I talk about how we can work together -- and I'll explain some strategies here in a minute -- but I also remind them that so long as the ed States uses illegal drugs, the drug dealers will find a way to get their products here.   We made some progress on reducing demand. Since 2001, the rate of drug use among the young has dropped by 24 percent. Young people's use of marijuana is down by 25 percent. The use of ecstasy has dropped by more than 50 percent. Methamphetamine use is down by 64 percent. Overall it's estimated that 860,000 fewer young people in America are using drugs today than when we began. But obviously we still have a lot of work to do. And so my commitment to our friends in the neighborhood is, the ed States will continue to implement its comprehensive strategy to do our part to reduce demand for illegal drugs.   Secondly, we're working to intercept illegal drugs before they reach our citizens. Every day the men and women of the DEA, the Coast Guard, the Border Patrol and other law enforcement organizations are working tirelessly to intercept drugs, to stop money laundering, and to bust the gangs that are sping this poison throughout our society. We've had some success. We've seized record amounts of cocaine coming into the ed States. Last year these efforts resulted in a significant disruption of the availability of cocaine in 38 major cities. We still have more work to do.   And a final leg of our strategy is this: We will work with our partners, Mexico and the countries of Central America, to take on the international drug trade. I am deeply concerned about how lethal and how brutal these drug lords are. I have watched with admiration how President Calderón has taken a firm hand in making sure his society is free of these drug lords. And the tougher Mexico gets, the more likely it is that these drug families and these kingpins will try to find safe haven in Central America.   And that is why I committed my administration to the Merida Initiative. It's a partnership, a cooperative partnership with Mexico and Central America that will help them deal with the scourge of these unbelievably wealthy and unbelievably violent drug kingpins. And I want to work with Congress to make sure that, one, they fully pass our request in the upcoming supplemental debate, and also remind members of Congress that the strategy that we have put forth is a strategy designed with the leadership of the Central American countries, as well as with Mexico. It's a strategy designed to be effective. And so when Congress passes our supplemental request, they also got to make sure that they implement the strategy we proposed in full.   Another challenge is promoting social justice in the region. Nearly one out of four people in Latin America lives on a day. Children never finish grade school. Mothers have trouble finding a doctor. In the age of growing prosperity and abundance, this is a problem that the ed States must take seriously. As the most prosperous country in the world, the ed States is reaching out to help our partners improve the lives of their citizens.   Social justice requires access to decent health care. And so we're helping meet health care needs in some of the most remote parts of Latin America, primarily by using the ed States military's medical personnel to treat local citizens.   I'll never forget going to Guatemala and seeing the clinics run by our troops. America is a compassionate country. We're plenty strong when we need to be. But our military has provided unbelievably good care for a lot of people who have never seen health care before. The missions last year provided treatment for 340,000 individuals in 15 countries. And this year, a new series of humanitarian assistant missions will treat an additional 320,000. And it's so important when people think of America and think of the neighborhood that they understand social justice is at the forefront of our agenda.   Social justice requires access to decent education, as well. And since 2004, the taxpayers of the ed States have provided more than 0 million for education programs throughout the region, with a special emphasis, a special focus on rural and marginalized populations.   Last year as well, the Secretary and I announced a new partnership for Latin America youth, to help train thousands of young people in the Americas with their English, and to provide opportunity to study here in the ed States. And the reason why is simple: We want people in our neighborhood to have the skills necessary to take advantage of the opportunities of the 21st century. It's in the interest of the ed States that we promote good health policies and good education policies.   Social justice also requires institutions that are fair, effective and free of corruption. It's hard to have a hopeful society when leadership steals the taxpayers' money. It's hard to have a hopeful place when the people aren't comfortable with the nature of government. And so we'll continue our bilateral aid, and I'm proud of the amounts of money we're spending in the region. But we've also changed the way that we're providing aid by insisting upon rules of governance, rule of law, the education -- the investment in education and health of its people, and governments to embrace marketplace economies.   And we do this what's called -- through what's called the Millennium Challenge Account. It is a new way to say that, yes, we're going to provide taxpayers' money, but we expect something in return from the governments that we help. I don't think it's too much to ask a government that receives U.S. aid to fight corruption. Matter of fact, I think it's a request that's long overdue. I don't think it's too much to ask a government that we help to invest in the health and education of their children. Nor do I think it's too much to ask for a government to accept marketplace economics.   The Millennium Challenge Account has invested 0 million in our region thus far to assist the countries of El Salvador, Guyana, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay and Peru. Let me talk about just some of the initiatives to give you a sense for the types of programs we're talking about.   In Honduras, the ed States is providing assistance to nearly 1,300 farmers so they can develop their farmland and provide for their families. In Nicaragua, we've helped small farmers and entrepreneurs increase their productivity in rural communities. In Paraguay, we're working to -- with local leaders to reduce the cost of starting new businesses.   See, the whole purpose is to encourage enterprise, infrastructure that will help people get goods to markets; to provide the capacity -- increase the capacity of these countries to be able to provide hope for their people. This is a really good program, and the Congress needs to fully fund it as they debate the appropriations bills this year.   The Millennium Challenge Account is one way to promote prosperity, but perhaps the most -- not "perhaps" -- the most effective way is through trade. Trade brings increased economic opportunities to both the people of Latin America and the people of the ed States.   Congress recognized this opportunities, and Congress took a look at whether or not we ought to have free trade agreements in our neighborhood, and they started doing so with Peru. And the bill, thankfully -- the trade bill with Peru passed by a large bipartisan majority. It's a good agreement. It's good for Peru. It also happens to be good for the ed States. And now my call on Congress is to take that same spirit by which they passed the Peruvian free trade agreement and do the same thing for Colombia and Panama.   About 17 months ago, the ed States signed a free trade agreement with Colombia. Ever since, my administration has worked closely with Congress to seek a bipartisan path for considering this agreement. I understand trade votes are hard. And that's why we continually reached out with -- to Congress. We've had more than 400 consultations, meetings and calls. We've led trips to Colombia for more than 50 members of Congress. We worked closely with congressional leaders from both parties. We responded to concerns over labor and environmental standards by including some of the most rigorous protections of any trade agreement in the history of the ed States. We have bent over backwards to work with members from both parties on the Hill.   And despite this, Congress has refused to act. One month ago I sent the bill -- I sent the bill to implement the agreement to the Congress. Yet the Speaker chose to block it instead of giving it an up or down vote that the Congress had committed to. Her action is unprecedented. It is extremely unfortunate. I hope the Speaker is going to change her mind. I hope you help her to change her mind. If she doesn't, the agreement is dead, and this will be bad for our workers, our businesses, and it will be bad for America's national security.   Approving the agreement would strengthen our economy. Today almost all of Colombia's exports enter the ed States duty-free. Yet American products exported to Colombia face tariffs of up to 35 percent for non-agricultural goods, and much higher for many agricultural products. Think about that. They export into the ed States duty-free, and we don't have the same advantage. I would call that a one-sided economic agreement.   Failure to pass the free trade agreement, therefore, is making it much harder to sell our products into Colombia. To try to put this in perspective for you, this weekend we reached an unfortunate milestone when the tariffs imposed on U.S exports to Colombia reached an estimated billion since the free trade agreement was signed. There's a -- that's one billion good reasons why the ed States Congress ought to pass this bill. Passing the agreement we could create the -- (applause).   Members of Congress need to think about this. Once implemented, the Colombia free trade agreement would immediately eliminate tariffs on more than 80 percent of American exports of industrial and consumer goods. Many American exports of agriculture and construction equipment, aircraft and auto parts, and medical and scientific equipment would immediately enter Colombia duty-free. So would farm exports like high-quality beef, and cotton, and wheat, and soybeans, and fruit. And eventually, the agreement would eliminate all tariffs on U.S. goods and services.   Opening markets is especially important during this time of economic uncertainty. Last year, exports accounted for more than 40 percent of America's total economic growth. Forty percent of the growth was as a result of goods and services being sold from the ed States into foreign markets. With our economy slowing, it seems like to me that we should be doing everything possible to open up new markets for U.S. goods and services. More than 9,000 American companies, including 8,000 small and mid-sized firms, export to Colombia. And approving this agreement, opening up markets for their goods and services, would help them increase sales, would help them grow their businesses, and would help them pay good-paying jobs.   If you're interested in work in America, if you're interested in economic vitality, you ought to be doing everything you can to make it easier for U.S. companies to be selling overseas.   And finally, approving this agreement is a urgent national security priority. Colombia is one of our strongest allies in the Western Hemisphere. I admire President Uribe a lot. He is courageous. He shares our values. He is a strong, capable partner in fighting drugs and crime and terror. The Colombia government reports, since 2002 kidnappings in Colombia have dropped 83 percent, terrorist attacks are down 76 percent, murders have dropped by 40 percent. He's got a strong record of doing what he said he was going to do.   And despite the progress, Colombia remains under intense pressure in the region. It faces a continuing assault from the terrorist group known as FARC, which seizes hostages and murder innocent civilians. Colombia faces a hostile and anti-American neighbor in Venezuela, where the regime has forged an alliance with Cuba, collaborated with FARC terrorists, and provided sanctuary to FARC units.   President Uribe has stood strong. He has done so with the assurance of American support. Congress's failure to pass the Colombia free trade agreement has called this support into question. President Uribe told members of Congress that approving this agreement is one of the most important ways that America can show our unwavering commitment to Colombia. Congressional leaders need to send a message that we support this brave and courageous leader, and that we will not turn our back on one of our most steadfast allies. (Applause.)   Yesterday I met with the President of Panama. I assured him our efforts to get the Panamanian trade bill passed will be just as vociferous and vigorous as our efforts to get the Colombia trade bill passed. Congress must understand they have a chance to sp prosperity in our neighborhood; they have a chance to support friends in our neighborhood. And there's no better way to express that friendship than to support the Colombia free trade agreement, the Panamanian free trade agreement, and while they're at it, to send a clear message around the world that the South Korean free trade agreement is good for the U.S. economy as well.   The ties between the people of the ed States and the people of Latin America are important to our country. They're important to our prosperity, and they're important to the national security interest of the country. We share a deep bond, a bond between friends and a bond between neighbors. And because of this bond, the ed States will, and must, remain committed to making sure that Latin America is a place of opportunity, a place of hope, a place of social justice, a place where basic necessities, like health care and education, are not too much for any child to dream about. Or a place where poverty gives way to prosperity, and a place, above all, where freedom is the birthright of every citizen.   I want to thank you for taking on the cause. I thank you for your vision; I thank you for your steadfast support of doing what's right in our neighborhood. And it's been my honor to come and share some thoughts with you. God bless. (Applause.) 200806/41534。

  • To those old allies whose cultural and spiritual origins we share, we pledge the loyalty of faithful friends. ed there is little we cannot do in a host of cooperative ventures. Divided there is little we can do—for we dare not meet a powerful challenge at odds and split asunder. To those new states whom we welcome to the ranks of the free, we pledge our word that one form of colonial control shall not have passed away merely to be replaced by a far more iron tyranny. We shall not always expect to find them supporting our view. But we shall always hope to find them strongly supporting their own freedom—and to remember that, in the past, those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside. To those people in the huts and villages of half the globe struggling to break the bonds of mass misery, we pledge our best efforts to help them help themselves, for whatever period is required —not because the Communists may be doing it, not because we seek their votes, but because it is right. If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. To our sister republics south of our border, we offer a special pledge: to convert our good words into good deeds, in a new alliance for progress, to assist free men and free governments in casting off the chains of poverty. But this peaceful revolution of hope cannot become the prey of hostile powers. Let all our neighbors know that we shall join with them to oppose aggression or subversion anywhere in the Americas. And let every other power know that this hemisphere intends to remain the master of its own house. To that world assembly of sovereign states, the ed Nations, our last best hope in an age where the instruments of war have far outpaced the instruments of peace, we renew our pledge of support — to prevent it from becoming merely a forum for invective, to strengthen its shield of the new and the weak, and to enlarge the area in which its writ may run.201110/158695。
  • President Bush Welcomes Members of the 2008 ed States Summer Olympic Team to the White House THE PRESIDENT: Thanks. Welcome to the Rose Garden. Please sit down. We are thrilled to welcome members of America's 2008 Summer Olympic and Paralympic teams to the White House. Welcome. (Applause.) Today we honor skill and discipline. You're here because of the support of your coaches and your trainers and your families and your friends. They are proud of what you've accomplished -- and so are the American people. And we're looking forward to rooting for you in Beijing. (Applause.) Mr. Secretary, thanks for coming. I want to welcome the U.S. Olympic Committee staff; welcome the military personnel who are with us; and welcome the rest of you. (Laughter.)In the coming days, around 600 American athletes will arrive in China for the 29th Olympic Games. You're going to compete in 30 different sports, ranging from soccer to sailing and from judo to gymnastics. Together, the talented men and women of Team USA will represent the great diversity of our country. You come from nearly every state. Some of you are young -- the youngest teammate is a 15-year-old diver -- and some of you are old -- er. (Laughter.) There's a 58-year-old sailor, which gives this 62-year-old mountain biker hope -- (laughter) -- that you may need me in Beijing. (Laughter.)Team USA shows the great power of sports to bring people together -- and there's no sporting event that unites people like the Olympics. All Americans will rally behind you when you compete in Beijing. (Applause.)We will be fascinated by the different stories behind each athlete. We will marvel at your hard work and your discipline. For example, the story of Matt Grevers. Matt seemed like a long shot to qualify for the U.S. team in the 100-meter backstroke. Because his parents are Dutch, the Netherlands tried to recruit Matt to swim for his team -- offering him nearly a certain trip to Beijing. Instead he chose to compete for the U.S. team, and ended up qualifying in both the freestyle and the backstroke. And when he swims in Beijing, it will be as a proud citizen of the ed States of America.Or we think of the story of Lopez Lomong. When Lopez was just six years old, his family had to flee their village in Sudan when it was attacked by the Janjaweed. Lopez was separated from his family, who assumed he was dead. The little boy spent three years -- three days running from the militants, and then ten years in refugee camps. He finally made it to our country as a teenager and his athletic career took off. Earlier this month, Lopez qualified for the Olympics in the 1500 meters. And now the boy who once had to run for his life is a man about to run for gold in Beijing -- representing the ed States of America. (Applause.)We think about Scott Winkler. Scott didn't spend his whole life training to become an elite athlete -- but athletic competition helped give Scott his life back. Scott was an Army specialist serving in Iraq when an accident cost him the use of his legs. He found healing in the Wounded Warrior Project, in his work to mentor young people, and in wheelchair sports. Last month, a magnificent throw earned Scott an American record -- and a spot on the U.S. Paralympic team. And here's the way he put it: "I fought for this country, and now I'd love to win for this country" in Beijing. Scott, we honor your service to our country, we thank you for coming today, and we'll be pulling for you. (Applause.) America's Olympians have two very important things in common: God-given talent, and an appreciation for the hard work required to achieve true excellence. The amazing athletic displays we see on our TV every four years result from the hard work that our athletes put in during the four years. For us, it's a moment; for them it's a moment -- a life of dedication.Olympians don't rest on their laurels -- they wear them. (Laughter.) Being a champion takes character. It also entails responsibility. In Beijing you will convey our nation's most cherished values. As ambassadors of liberty, you will represent America's love for freedom and our regard for human rights and human dignity. You'll represent to other athletes and to the people of China. In Beijing, you'll also represent our nation's character. As ambassadors of goodwill, you will be humble in victory and gracious in defeat. And by showing respect for your competitors, you will demonstrate America's respect for the world.Laura and I look forward to joining you for the Olympics. I'm fired up to go. (Laughter.) I can't wait to salute our athletes, and I can't wait to share in the joy of your triumphs. And so today we send you off with congratulations on the success you have aly achieved, and on the accomplishments we know will be yours in Beijing.May you and your teammates compete "Swifter, Higher and Stronger" in the games. And may God bless you as you represent our wonderful nation. (Applause.)200807/44591。
  • PRESIDENT BUSH: Thank you very much. Mr. Secretary General, thank you for your hospitality. Its good to see you again. I remember our days together in the la frontera de Tejas y México, when I was the Governor of Texas and you were one of the leading officials of Mexico. And its great to see you here in Paris, también su esposa. Madam Secretary, thank you; Ambassadors; World War II veterans, and distinguished guests. Laura and I are having a wonderful trip through Europe, and we are so pleased to be back in Paris. Its been a little more than four years since we were last in Paris together, and a lot has changed. Laura wrote a book. (Laughter.) Our daughter got married. (Laughter.) My dad jumped out of an airplane. (Laughter.) And my hair is a lot grayer. (Laughter.) What has not changed is the friendship between America and France. Recent history has made clear that no disagreement can diminish the deep ties between our nations. France was Americas first friend. And over the centuries, our nations stood united in moments of testing -- from the Marne, to Omaha Beach to the long vigil of the Civil War* [sic]. After September the 11th, 2001, a major French newspaper published a headline my nation will never forget: "Nous sommes tous Americains." America is grateful to the people of France. Were proud to call you friends. And our alliance will stand the test of time.We gather to commemorate a landmark in the moment of that alliance, and thats the 60th anniversary of the start of the Marshall Plan. In 1948, the ed States Congress passed, President Harry Truman signed, legislation to fund this unprecedented effort. Just steps from here at the Chateau de la Muette -- the headquarters for the organization that implemented the Marshall Plan and worked with our allies to promote open economies and strong free market policies across Europe. Through this building flowed "friendly aid" that helped renew the spirit of the continent -- what one magazine called "the D-Day for peace." From this building came money for fuel and vehicles and machinery that helped bring Europes economies back to life. And in this building were written the first chapters of European unity -- a story of cooperation that eventually resulted in institutions like NATO and the European Union and the organization that carries the spirit of the Marshall Plan into a new century, the OECD.Marshall Plan was the source of aid and assistance, and it wisely gave Europeans a leading role in reconstruction. By doing so, the Plan conveyed a message of partnership and respect. And by offering help to nations across Europe --including communist nations -- the Plan also had the effect of clarifying the new ideological struggle that was unfolding.When he announced the Plan, Secretary Marshall made it clear it was "directed not against any country or doctrine, but against hunger and poverty and desperation and chaos." With these words, he showed that we stood for a future of unity and prosperity and freedom throughout Europe. Yet the leaders in the Kremlin denied the Marshall Plan aid to the suffering people of the Soviet Union and its captive nations. What followed was nearly a half century of repression and fear in the East, until at last freedom arrived. In an ironic final scene, the Soviets did accept some Western assistance after all: As the last Secretary General [sic] sat down to sign the papers ending the Soviet Union, he discovered that his pen was out of ink, so he borrowed one from an American news crew. In the years since the Cold War ended, Europe has taken inspiring strides toward a continent whole, free, and at peace. Over the past eight years, we have watched nations from the Baltics to the Balkans complete the transition from the Soviet bloc to the European Union. Weve seen former members of the Warsaw Pact proudly sign the treaty to join NATO. We witnessed an Orange Revolution in Ukraine, a Rose Revolution in Georgia, a declaration of independence in Kosovo, and the rise of a democratic movement in Belarus. America admires these brave stands for liberty. We look forward to the day when all free people on this continent take their rightful place in the institutions of Europe.With these changes has come a revitalization between the relationship -- of the relationship between Europe and the ed States. Instead of focusing on issues within Europe, were increasingly looking to matters of global reach. Instead of dwelling on our differences, were increasingly united in our interests and ideals. On my first trip abroad of my second term as President, I traveled to Brussels and called for "a new era of transatlantic unity." This week, I have seen the outlines of that new era. In leaders like Berlusconi and Brown and Merkel and Sarkozy, I see a commitment to a powerful and purposeful Europe that advances the values of liberty within its borders, and beyond. And when the time comes to welcome the new American President next January, I will be pleased to report to him that the relationship between the ed States and Europe is the broadest and most vibrant it has ever been.We see this broad and vibrant relationship in the expansive agenda for our meetings this week:America and Europe are cooperating to open new opportunities for trade and investment -- and were determined to help make this the year the world completes an ambitious Doha Round. America and Europe are cooperating to address the twin challenges of energy security and climate change while keeping our economies strong. We will continue working to diversify our energy supplies by developing and financing new clean energy technologies. We will continue working toward an international agreement that commits every major economy to slow, stop, and eventually reverse the growth of greenhouse gases.America and Europe are cooperating to widen the circle of development and prosperity. We lead the world in providing food aid, improving education for boys and girls, and fighting disease. Through the historic commitments of the ed States and other G8 countries, we are working to turn the tide against HIV/AIDS and malaria in Africa. To achieve this noble goal, all nations must keep their promises to deliver this urgent aid.America and Europe are cooperating on our most solemn duty of all -- protecting our citizens. From New York and Washington, to London and Madrid, to Copenhagen and Amsterdam, we have seen terrorists and extremists rejoice in the murder of the innocent. So America and Europe are applying the tools of intelligence and finance and law enforcement and diplomacy, and -- when necessary -- military power to break up terror networks and deny them safe havens. To protect the people of Europe from the prospect of ballistic missile attacks emanating from the Middle East, were developing a shared system of missile defense.These measures are critical to the success in the fight against terror. Yet as in the Cold War, we must also prevail in a wider struggle -- the battle of ideas. On one side are all who embrace the fundamental tenets of civilization -- the natural right to liberty, freedom of conscience and dissent, and the obligation of the strong to protect the weak. On the other side are men who place no value on life, allow no room for dissent, and use terror to impose their harsh ideology on as many people as possible.Ultimately, the only way to defeat the advocates of this ideology is to defeat their ideas. So the central aim of our foreign policy is to advance a more hopeful and compelling vision, especially in the broader Middle East, a vision on the ideals of liberty and justice and tolerance and hope. These ideals are the foundation of Frances Declaration of the Rights of Man and Americas Declaration of Independence. Yet these ideals do not belong to our nations alone. They are universal ideals. And the lesson of history is that by extending these ideals -- its more than a moral obligation, that by expending these -- extending these ideals is the only practical and realistic way to protect -- to provide our security and to sp the peace.The rise of free and prosperous societies in the broader Middle East is essential to peace in the 21st century, just as the rise of a free and prosperous Europe was essential to peace in the 20th century. So Europe and America must stand with reformers, democratic leaders, and millions of ordinary people across the Middle East who seek a future of hope and liberty and peace.In Afghanistan, we must stand with a brave young democracy determined to defeat al Qaeda and the Taliban. NATO has accepted an historic mission in Afghanistan. And I applaud the leadership of President Sarkozy, who hosted an international support conference yesterday, and will soon deploy additional forces to Afghanistan. President Sarkozy has said: "What is at stake in that country is the future of our values and that of the Atlantic Alliance." He is right. Our nations must ensure that Afghanistan is never again a safe haven for terror.In Lebanon, we must stand with those struggling to protect their sovereignty and independence. We must counter the dangers posed by Hezbollah terrorists supported by Iran and Syria. Together, we must show the people of Lebanon that they will have the lasting support of the free world.In the Holy Land, we must stand with Palestinians and Israelis and all others committed to a two-state solution -- a permanent peace based on two democratic states, Israel and Palestine, living side by side in security and peace. I firmly believe that with leadership and courage, a peace agreement is possible this year.In Iran and Syria, we must stand with the decent people of those two nations who deserve much better than the life they have today. We must stand -- we must firmly oppose Iran and Syrias support for terror. And for the security of Europe and for the peace of the world, we must not allow Iran to have a nuclear weapon.In Iraq, we must stand with the courageous people who have turned the momentum against al Qaeda and extremists. From Anbar province, to mixed neighborhoods in Baghdad, to the cities of Basra and Mosul, Iraqis of all backgrounds have made it clear they reject extremism and terror. Today, violence in Iraq is down to the lowest point since March of 2004. Civilian deaths are down. Sectarian killings are down. And as security has improved, economic life has been revived. Reconciliation is taking place in communities across that country. And the government in Baghdad is showing strong leadership and progress on the path to a free society. With the terrorists on the run and freedom on the rise, it is in the interests of every nation on this continent to support a stable and democratic Iraq.Since 2001, the freedom movement has been advancing in the Middle East. Kuwait has had elections in which women were allowed to vote and hold office for the first time. Algeria held its first competitive presidential elections. Citizens have voted in municipal elections in Saudi Arabia, in competitive parliamentary elections in Jordan and Morocco and Bahrain, and in a multiparty presidential election in Yemen.Liberty takes hold in different places in different ways, so we must continue to adapt and find innovative ways to support those movements for freedom. The way to do so is to stand with civil society groups, human rights organizations, dissidents, independent journalists and bloggers, and others on the leading edge of reform. We have taken important steps in this area, such as the Broader Middle East and North America Initiative** [sic] led by the ed States, the Forum for Freedom*** [sic] led by the G8, and the Partnership for Democratic Governance led by the OECD.Sping the hope of freedom is the calling of our time. And as we look ahead to the great task, we can be guided by four key principles: unity, confidence, vision, and resolve.We must go forward with unity. Over the course of the Cold War, the transatlantic alliance faced moments of serious tension -- from the Suez Crisis in the 1950s to the basing of missiles in Europe in the 1980s. Yet with the distance of time, we can see these differences for what they were -- fleeting disagreements between friends. Well have more disagreements in the decades ahead, but we must never allow those disagreements to undermine our shared purposes. Dividing democracies is one of our enemies goals, and they must not be allowed to succeed.We must go forward with confidence. Our vision of freedom and peace in the Middle East and beyond is ambitious, and of course there will be voices that will say it will never arrive. And thats natural, and its not new. There were times when it seemed impossible that there could ever be peace between Britain and France, or France and Germany, or between Germany and Poland. Yet today all those nations are at peace, and war in Europe is virtually unimaginable. Something happened in Europe that defied the skeptics and the pattern of the centuries, and that was the sp of human freedom.In truth, this is a strange time to doubt the power of liberty. Over the past 30 years, the number of democracies has grown from 45 to more than 120, which is the fastest advance of freedom in history. As some of the worlds oldest democracies, we should never be surprised by the appeal of freedom. We should stand against the moral relativism that views all forms of government as equally acceptable. And we should be confident that one day, the same determination and desire that brought freedom to Paris and Berlin and Riga will bring freedom to Gaza, Damascus, and Tehran.We must go forward with a clear vision. In the Cold War, we laid out a vision of liberty and trusted its power to transform societies. And that transformation took place in ways almost no one could foresee. In the late 1970s, for example, many in the West worried we were losing. And then one October afternoon, there came a sign as bright as the white smoke above the Sistine Chapel. Onto the balcony of St. Peters stepped the first Polish pope in history, who inspired millions behind the Iron Curtain with his call, "Be not afraid." John Pauls election was followed by the elections of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan -- who helped restore confidence in freedoms power, and pursued a policy of peace through strength. And HishIsoon other remarkable events began unfolding: shipyard workers in Gdansk brought down a government, a jailed playwright in Prague touched off a Velvet Revolution, and citizens of Berlin prayed for the end of a wall and then found the strength to tear it down.Todays struggle we have again laid out a clear vision of freedom, and it will transform lives in the Middle East and beyond in ways we cannot fully predict. We can see some of the sources of change. Sixty percent of the Middle East population is under 30 years old, and over time these young people -- surfing the Internet, and watching satellite television, and studying abroad -- will demand that their societies fully join the free world. The womens movement in the region is growing, and over time this movement will spark reform, as mothers and daughters make clear that it is costly and unwise to keep half the population from fully contributing to the life of a nation. Middle Eastern immigrants here in Europe are seeing the benefits of freedom, and over time they will insist that the liberty of their adopted homelands also belongs in the lands of their birth. The future of the region is the hands of its people, and those of us who live in free societies must continue to encourage these early stirrings of reform.Finally, we must go forward with resolve. In the years ahead, there will be periods of difficulty, yet history shows that freedom can endure even the hardest tests. Picture what the future of Europe must have looked like for leaders meeting here in Paris 60 years ago: Moscow had occupied much of Central and Eastern Europe after World War II. Communist parties had threatened governments in Italy and here in France. A severe Soviet threat imperiled Greece and Turkey. A communist coup had toppled the elected government of Czechoslovakia. Stalin ordered a blockade of Berlin.Yet in America and in free capitals of Europe, we summoned the resolve to prevail. We launched the Marshall Plan and the Berlin Airlift. Then came the signing of the North Atlantic Treaty and the formation of West Germany. Looking back over the decades, we can see that these brave early measures put us on the path to victory in the Cold War.There are moments today when the situation in places like the Middle East can look as daunting as it did in Europe six decades ago. Yet we can have confidence that liberty once again will prevail. We can have confidence because freedom is the longing of every soul, and it is the direction of history. We can have confidence because men and women in the Middle East and beyond are determined to claim their liberty, just as the people of Europe did in the last century.Near the end of his life, George Marshall made a final trip to Europe. He came not for a military meeting or a diplomatic summit, but to accept the Nobel Peace Prize. In his address, Marshall offered a bold prediction: "Tyranny inevitably must retire before the tremendous moral strength of the gospel of freedom." Sixty years ago, the faith in liberty helped the gospel of freedom ring out in nations devastated by war. Today, freedom rings out across this continent. And one day, freedom will ring out across the world.Thank you for having me. God bless.200806/42150。
  • President Bush and President Uribe of the Republic of Colombia Participate in Joint Press AvailabilityPRESIDENT BUSH: Good morning, Mr. President. Welcome back to the White House. I appreciate your friendship and I admire your bold leadership. You have transformed your nation and you have made Colombia a powerful example of how democracy can work in our neighborhood, and I congratulate you.Colombia is one of our closest allies and we have worked together on many important issues and we will continue to do so. We worked to improve security and advance freedom. The ed States supports Colombia's efforts to modernize its security forces, to fight terrorists and drug kingpins, and to provide Colombians with alternatives to lives of terror and narco-trafficking.And your efforts are working. I think it's very important for the people of the ed States to hear these statistics: Since you took office, Mr. President, homicides have dropped by 40 percent, kidnappings have dropped by more than 80 percent, terrorist attacks have dropped by more than 70 percent. That is a very strong record. Because of your decisive actions the Marxist terrorist network known as the FARC has been put on the run. And our country admired greatly the rescue efforts made by your -- by your team, of 15 hostages, including three Americans. And thank you for meeting with them.In the last few years, thousands of members of FARC have deserted. They've realized the empty promise of the leaders of -- you know, won't be met. And you have offered these folks a better life and a better alternative.It's also -- it's in our interest to continue to support Colombia. What happens in Colombia can affect life here in the ed States. You've got a strong supporter here. And after I leave office, it's going to be very important for the next President and the next Congress to stand squarely by your side.We're working together to open up markets and increase prosperity. Next week, the President and I will be meeting with leaders throughout our hemisphere in New York to discuss the importance of free and fair trade. We're going to send a clear message -- that increasing trade is essential to the economic well-being of every nation in our region; that our neighborhood will prosper if we trade freely. You're our fourth largest trading partner. Trade between our two nations reached billion last year, and that's beneficial for the people of Colombia and it's beneficial for the people of the ed States.And I believe it's in our interest to continue to open new markets for both countries. Most of Colombia's products enter the ed States today duty-free. Most of ours face tariffs up to 35 percent or higher. In essence that's -- that makes our goods and services less competitive. We negotiated an agreement in November of 2006, nearly two years ago, which leveled the playing field; our negotiators worked hard to treat each other fairly. It's in our economic interest that we -- that we have free trade and fair trade. It's in our economic interest that we continue to open up markets in our neighborhood, particularly with a nation that is growing like yours.And yet, we can't get a vote out of Congress. I've been asking the Democrat leadership in Congress for a vote, and they've consistently blocked the vote. And members of Congress from both parties have got to understand the following facts. First of all, about half our growth last year, Mr. President, was because of exports. In other words, exports have affected our economy in a positive way. If that's the case, it seems like we ought to be encouraging exports, not discouraging them.Secondly, a lot of small businesses trade -- send goods and services to Colombia. It's important for the small business sector to be vital and strong. Thirdly, a lot of jobs depend upon exports. If we can create exports it makes it more likely somebody is going to have good work.And so this bill is in everybody's interest, and I urge the Congress to carefully consider not only the economic interest at stake, but the national security interest at stake of not approving this piece of legislation.Mr. President, you've been a good friend and it has been a real pleasure to have worked with you during these years. You have done what you said you were going to do. You've been an honest man, forthright and open. And you deserve the support of the ed States of America. You've had it during my administration; you will have it to end of my administration. And I ask that the Congress carefully consider the importance of this relationship as they think about different pieces of legislation to pass before the term ends.Bienvenidos.PRESIDENT URIBE: Muchas gracias. Inmensamente agradecido.Mr. President, I have no words to express my gratitude to you, to your team, for your permanent interest in our country, for your friendship for my country.We have made significant progress. And one very essential portion of this progress has been your help, the help of the ed States. We are working to have Colombia with more confidence -- confidence to invest in Colombia, to live in Colombia, to study in Colombia, to find jobs in Colombia. And we support confidence upon three pillars: security with democracy -- it means security with democratic values, with pluralism, with freedoms, with dissent. The second pillar is investment -- investment with social responsibility, security and investment, create a framework for prosperity. And in a part of prosperity, it is possible to create social cohesion, and social cohesion is the validator for security and for investment.Therefore, you see that our policy is based upon the universal democratic values we share with the ed States. Your support has been very important for Colombia to face the threat of terrorists and for Colombia to maintain and to grow deeper and deeper with respect to universal democratic values.The free trade agreement is one of the main aspects of our bilateral relationships. You have understood the importance of this agreement for both countries. It could be that our economy is a very small economy to be considering trade agreements. But for us, it is very important. And it is very important not only from the political standpoint but also from the economic standpoint.200809/49736。
  • (G;H;ajI1dB!hFcU[Upf4vny8FyulvkOFor better or for worse, your generation has been appointed by history to deal with those problems and to lead America toward a new age. You have the chance never before afforded to any people in any age. You can help build a society where the demands of morality, and the needs of the spirit, can be realized in the life of the Nation.So, will you join in the battle to give every citizen the full equality which God enjoins and the law requires, whatever his belief, or race, or the color of his skin?Will you join in the battle to give every citizen an escape from the crushing weight of poverty?Will you join in the battle to make it possible for all nations to live in enduring peace -- as neighbors and not as mortal enemies?Will you join in the battle to build the Great Society, to prove that our material progress is only the foundation on which we will build a richer life of mind and spirit?WS1@9qzLW6.0cz(2*+1p;8FrY+MmK#Dj!uy]!xWV^m(Mm]V[hQqCFrP6p)%a165842。
分页 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29